Additional Missing Works of Art

Bernardo Bellotto

View of the Grand Canal in Venice

Medium: oil on Canvas
Height: 22.83 in. (58.00 cm.)
Width: 33.10 in. (84.00 cm.)
Property of the Borbone-Parma collection

Taken by soldiers of the German Army from Villa delle Pianore, Lucca, Italy, in the spring of 1944.

(Source: Treasures Untraced. An Inventory of the Italian Art Treasures Lost During the Second World War, 1995)

Alonso Cano

St. Agnes

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 43.70 in. (111.00 cm.)
Width: 33.85 in. (86.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 414B; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Jan van de Capelle

Silent sea with Sailboats

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 17.71 in. (45.00 cm.)
Width: 27.95 in. (71.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 875A; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio

St. Matthew and the Angel

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 87.79 in. (223.00 cm.)
Width: 72.04 in. (183.00 cm.)
Property of ​the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 365; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Lovis Corinth

Girl braiding her hair

Medium: Oil on canvas
Height: 35.43 in. (90.00 cm.)
Width: 31.49 in. (80.00 cm.)
Property of the Carl Sachs collection.

Gallery Heinemann, Munich – Moderne Galerie Thannhauser, Munich (1914) – Carl Sachs, Breslau (1916) – After the confiscation of the Sachs collection In Breslau with Kunstsammlungen Görlitz (1940), disappeared thereafter.

The Breslau art collector Carl Sachs managed to emigrate to Switzerland. However he was forced to leave the largest part of his collection behind. The directors of the art museums in Breslau and Görlitz, Cornelius Müller-Hofstede and Siegfried Asche divided numerous works from the Sachs collection up between their institutions in coordination with the Nazi authorities. The "Girl braiding her hair" was taken by the Görlitz Museum, was brought to Kuhna for safekeeping during the war and has been missing since.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Lovis Corinth

Portrait of a girl / Anny Schaumburg with doll

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 35.43 in. (90.00 cm.)
Width: 21.26 in. (54.00 cm.)
Property of Robert Schanz

Lost from Kuhna Castle, Lower Silesian, (now Kunów, Poland) Inv. 186267, between 1942 and 1945.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Lovis Corinth

Reclining Girl

Medium: oil on panel
Height: 22.44 in. (57.00 cm.)
Width: 45.27 in. (115.00 cm.)
Property of the Oskar Skaller collection

The Berlin art collector Oskar Skaller was able to emigrate in 1939. His household goods, part of which was this painting by Corinth, were seized by the Gestapo and auctioned off in Berlin in 1942. The Corinth painting came into the possession of the dubious real estate agent and art lover Conrad Doebbeke, who began assembling his collection in 1933/34, gathering a variety of paintings from Jewish owners. In the case of "Reclining Girl" by Corinth, Doebbeke even asked the Gestapo for their support. In 1977, the picture briefly emerged on the German art market (Weinmüller, Munich) only to immediately disappear again.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Camille Corot

The courtyard at the well

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 9.05 in. (23.00 cm.)
Width: 14.37 in. (36.50 cm.)
Property of the Max Silberberg Collection

A. Young, London - T. Agnew & Sons, London (1906) - Christie's London (1910) - Cottier, Paris - Max Silberberg, Breslau - Auction Paul Graupe, Berlin, 21 March1935, No. 17

This little painting is one of several works by Corot, which until 1935 were part of the major and then internationally known collection of Max Silberberg in Breslau. It has not been proven in either exhibitions or auctions since the Graupe auction in 1935. Its current whereabouts are unknown.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Lucas Cranach the Elder

Virgin Mary with Child and baby Saint John

Medium: oil on linden wood panel
Height: 30.32 in. (77.00 cm.)
Width: 22.44 in. (57.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly the Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 559 A; Missing from Berlin Friedrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Biagio d’Antonio

Battle of Veio

Medium: oil on wood
Height: 20.28 in. (51.50 cm.)
Width: 59.00 in. (169.00 cm.)
Property of Fritz Gutmann Collection

ca.1470; confiscated Holland March 1942; last seen in New York in 1954.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Dosso Dossi (attributed)

Small Portrait of a Young man

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 5.31 in. (13.50 cm.)
Width: 4.15 in. (10.50 cm.)
Property of Fritz Gutmann Collection

ca.1520; Confiscated by the the Nazi Looting organisation (ERR) from the Wacker-Bondy storage at 236 Blvd. Raspail, Paris, France in June 1942. Last seen in Hermann Georing's Collection.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Anthonis van Dyck

Lamentation of Christ

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 86.61 in. (220.00 cm.)
Width: 65.35 in. (166.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 778; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Melozzo da Forli

Dialectic

Medium: oil on popular panel
Height: 59.00 in. (150.00 cm.)
Width: 43.30 in. (110.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 54; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Galasso Galassi

Christ on the Mount of Olives

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 62.60 in. (159.00 cm.)
Width: 94.10 in. (239.00 cm.)
Property of the Berta Morelli Collection

After consulting the lists of confiscated Jewish property in Vienna, the art dealer Herrmann Posse who was hired by Adolf Hitler for the planned Linz museum, was interested in the paintings from Berta Morelli which had been put under Nazi control. In 1940 he bought the paintings “Christus am Ölberg” and “Die Wiedergenesene” from Berta Morelli for the Hitler Museum in Linz. After the war, the U.S. military government found the paintings in a salt mine and brought them to the Collecting Point in Munich. The paintings were sent back to the Austrian authorities so that they could be restituted to their original owner, Berta Morelli. However, the Austrian government has so far refused to restitute the paintings to Bertha Morelli’s heirs.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Albert Leon Gleizes

Landscape close to Paris

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 28.66 in. (72.80 cm.)
Width: 34.29 in. (87.10 cm.)
Property of the Sophie Lissitzky-Küppers Collection

In 1937 confiscated from the Landesmuseum in Hannover, Germany, where it was on loan. Gallery Buchholz Berlin, whereabouts unknown.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Erich Heckel

Mrs. Siddi Heckel seated at a table

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 31.49 in. (80.00 cm.)
Width: 27.55 in. (70.00 cm.)
Property of the Alfred and Thekla Hess collection

This artwork is among those that were in the collection of Alfred and Thekla Hess. After Alfred Hess died in 1931, the collection went to his son Hans Hess.

With the Nazi seizure of power, Hans and Thekla Hess were subjected to Nazi persecution. Hans Hess lost his job at the Ullstein publishing house and was forced out of Germany in 1933. First he fled to Paris and later to England where he had no money and no steady income and tried to survive with occasional small jobs. The art collection remained with his mother Tekla Hess in Germany. She was able to safely store a large part of the collection outside of Germany by sending it to the Kunsthalle Basel for an exhibition in October 1933. Later the Kunsthaus Zurich agreed to take in the collection, first for an exhibition in June 1934 and later for further safekeeping. Due to export restrictions Tekla Hess was not permitted to permanently remove the collection from Germany, but was only allowed to send them out on a temporary loan based on a so-called “freipass” which was issued by the authorities for temporary loans outside of Germany. According to the export laws, the collection had to be sent back to Germany after the end of the exhibition.

On September 15, 1935 the German parliament enacted the Nuremberg racial laws which severely restricted both the economic and civil rights of Jews in Germany. This set the stage for the plundering of Jewish property and forced many Jewish families to flee Germany. In addition, Jews were also forced to pay prohibitive exit taxes and Jewish taxes which effectively stripped them of their property.

In 1936 two GESTAPO agents visited Tekla Hess and threatened her with criminal sanctions if she did not return her art collection to Germany. Following this, Tekla Hess asked the Kunsthaus Zurich to have the artworks shipped to the Cologne Art Union, where the director had agreed to store them for Mrs. Hess.

Tekla Hess emigrated to London in 1939. The artworks remained stored in a crate in the basement of the Cologne Art Union.

When Tekla Hess asked for her paintings after the war, in 1947, the director of the museum wrote back to her and informed her that they could no longer locate the artworks. The Cologne Art Union building had sustained a bombing attack and the Hess artworks were either lost or looted. Two years later, a few paintings reappeared as they were impounded by the police in connection with the most notorious robbery counterfeiting proceeding after the war. These few paintings were returned to the Hess family. However, many others remain missing until today, including the Gobelin and the Heckel paintings.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Erich Heckel

Still life with wooden figure

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 39.37 in. (100.00 cm.)
Width: 27.55 in. (70.00 cm.)
Property of the Thekla and Alfred Hess Collection

This artwork is among those that were in the collection of Alfred and Thekla Hess. After Alfred Hess died in 1931, the collection went to his son Hans Hess.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

David Hoyer

Self-portrait

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 27.56 in. (70.00 cm.)
Width: 24.41 in. (62.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 1032; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Girl in Hammock

Property of the Thekla and Alfred Hess collection

This painting belonged to the Hess collection. Tekla Hess sent it to the Cologne Art Union in 1935, where it was part of a Nolde retrospective. It is unknown what happened to the painting thereafter, and its current whereabouts are unknown.

This painting also belonged to the Alfred Hess collection. After his death his son Hans Hess inherited the collection.

In severe financial distress, Hans Hess penniless in England having been forced to emigrate after losing his job, and Tekla Hess struggling to survive in Germany, sent the painting together with other artworks to the Berlin art dealer Thannhauser in 1935, where it was offered for sale in 1936. Since then the painting has been missing.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Portrait of Carl Sternheim

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 24.01 in. (61.00 cm.)
Width: 17.71 in. (45.00 cm.)
Property of the Max Fischer collection

When Max Fischer emigrated from Germany to the US in October 1935 to flee Nazi persecution, he left the painting in his Berlin apartment. None of the paintings he left behind in Berlin have been returned.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Paul Klee

Landscape with Rising Moon (House and Moon)

Medium: Aquarell
Height: 7.28 in. (18.50 cm.)
Width: 8.66 in. (22.00 cm.)
Property of the Sophie Lissitzky-Küppers collection

In the Küppers collection, from which it was loaned to the Landesmuseum in Hannover, Germany. Confiscated in 1937, today in unknown private collection.

Oskar Kokoschka

Alpine Landscape, Mürren

Medium: Oil on canvas

Date: 1912
Museum: Pinakothek der Moderne
Location: Munich, Germany

It was sold to Fritz and Thea by Paul Cassirer in the 1920s and was looted. It is now in Munich in the Pinakothek Modern.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Max Liebermann

Martha Liebermann in an armchair (Portrait of a Lady)

Medium: Oil on canvas
Height: 45.47 in. (115.50 cm.)
Width: 35.82 in. (91.00 cm.)
Property of the Max and Martha Liebermann Collection

Seized in Berlin in 1943, 24 - 27.5.1955 Auction Ketterer, No 1610, 1955 Gallery Neumeister & Graef, Munich, Museum Georg Schäfer, Schweinfurt.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Max Liebermann

Portrait of the artist's parents

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 47.24 in. (120.00 cm.)
Width: 59.06 in. (150.00 cm.)
Property of the Martha and Max Liebermann Collection

Lost in Berlin in 1943.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Max Liebermann

Resting reading woman (the artists wife)

Medium: Watercolor/Gouache on cardboard
Height: 11.22 in. (28.50 cm.)
Width: 13.39 in. (34.00 cm.)
Property of the Martha and Max Liebermann Liebermann Collection

With Wolfgang Gurlitt in Munich after WWII, Collection G. Stein in Bonn, Gebhardt in Munich, unknown private collection.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Max Liebermann

The artist's daughter (full-length, seated)

Medium: oil on paper
Height: 21.26 in. (54.00 cm.)
Width: 14.76 in. (37.50 cm.)
Property of the Martha and Max Liebermann Collection

Portrait of Liebermann’s daughter Kaethe painted in 1898, on a photo in 1914 it was hanging in the Liebermann’s Wannsee Villa in Berlin. In 1930 it hung in the dining room of his house on Pariser Platz, Berlin. After Martha Liebermann’s suicide in 1943 the picture was confiscated and sold by the Gestapo.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Max Liebermann

The artist’s daughter (half length portrait)

Medium: oil on cardboard
Height: 16.14 in. (41.00 cm.)
Width: 12.99 in. (33.00 cm.)
Property of the Martha and Max Liebermann Collection

Portrait of Liebermann’s daughter Kaethe painted in 1893. It can be seen in photos: in 1904 it was hanging in the sitting room of his house on Pariser Platz, Berlin., in 1930 in the dining room. After Martha Liebermann’s suicide in 1943 the picture was confiscated and sold by the Gestapo.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Edouard Manet

Mr. Arnaud on horseback

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 87.00 in. (221.00 cm.)
Width: 53.14 in. (135.00 cm.)
Property of Martha und Max Liebermann

Provenance: Max Liebermann, Martha Liebermann; Thannhauser 1936; W. Scharff; C. Grassi; Geschenk der Witwe an das Museum Civica Galleria d´Art Moderna, Milan.
Circumstances of loss: Berlin 1936

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Edouard Manet

Portrait of young Henry Bernstein

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 31.49 in. (80.00 cm.)
Property of the Schiff Giorgini Collection, Paris

Stolen by Nazi troops in 1943.

(Source: Treasures Untraced. An Inventory of the Italian Art Treasures Lost During the Second World War, 1995

Adolph von Menzel

Blumenmarkt auf dem Boulevard St. Martin (Flower Market on the Boulevard St. Martin)

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 9.45 in. (24.00 cm.)
Width: 13.39 in. (34.00 cm.)
Property of the Max and Martha Liebermann Collection

The Berlin art collector Julius Aufsesser published in his 1926 book " Out of my collectors life " the image of an oil painting, the flower market on the Boulevard St. Martin in Paris, which had so far been kept in the seclusion of an artist's house " which derived from Menzel's first stay in Paris (Aufsesser erroneously dated it 1857) and he writes : "a work delicious in movement and color, in free treatment of the great local scenery, with an abundance of hints to the artist's previous paintings and graphic works visible in the group formations and movement, a painting in masterful technical treatment quickly thrown-down, fulfilling all the finest characteristics of the culture of painting" . Max Liebermann, who appreciated Menzel in particular, owned about 60 of his drawings and acquired the painting on 07/08/1926 at the renowned art dealer Paul Cassirer for 8,000 Reichsmarks. In 1943, after Martha Liebermann's suicide , it was confiscated and sold by the Gestapo.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Edvard Munch

The Scream

Medium: Lithograph
Property of the Prof. Curt Glaser Collection

Prof. Glaser was the Director of the State Art Library in Berlin. He was a prominent art historian, art critic, and a distinguished art collector and patron. He became a victim of the Nazi purges shortly after they came to power in early 1933, when he was forced out of his position as Director of the Berlin State Art Library. His initial suspension was ultimately justified by his dismissal based on a Nazi law (Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service) enacted in April 1933, which forbade Jews and political opponents from serving in German civil servant positions. He also lost his state-owned Berlin apartment when the Nazis turned the building in which he was living, Prinz Albrecht Strasse 8, into the

headquarters of the newly formed secret police (GESTAPO). Glaser was singled out by the Nazis as an unwanted Jewish museum director, at a time when the Nazis wanted to control art as a part of their political ideology. As a result, he had no professional and personal future in Nazi Germany and had no choice but to leave Germany.

In order to finance his flight from Germany, Prof. Glaser had to sell most of his belongings in two auctions in May 1933 including large parts of his art library and art collection which included many valuable artworks by Edvard Munch, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Lovis Corinth, and others. One auction took place immediately before the book burnings in Berlin and the other one took place immediately after the book burnings. The Glaser auctions took place at a time when many Jews were also fleeing Germany and selling their belongings for whatever price they could get. This caused a situation where artworks from Jewish collections, including the high-quality Glaser collection, were sold at fire sale prices. Today, Glaser artworks from the Berlin auctions are scattered all over the world, including in several museums, some of which have already been restituted.

One of the artworks sold under these conditions in 1933 was a well-known lithograph by Edvard Munch “The Scream.” The lithograph is inscribed with a personal dedication to Prof. Glaser’s wife, Elsa: “An Frau Dr. Glaser in freundliche Erinnerung” (“To Mrs. Glaser with fond memories”). Its current whereabouts are unknown.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Emil Nolde

Hindu Head

Medium: oil
Height: 24.01 in. (61.00 cm.)
Width: 22.04 in. (56.00 cm.)
Property of the Thekla and Alfred Hess collection

This painting belonged to the Hess collection. Tekla Hess sent it to the Cologne Art Union in 1935, where it was part of a Nolde retrospective. It is unknown what happened to the painting thereafter, and its current whereabouts are unknown.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Emil Nolde

Poppies and Roses

Medium: oil
Height: 28.85 in. (73.30 cm.)
Width: 88.30 in. (34.76 cm.)
Property of the Otto Nathan Deutsch Collection

In 1939, Otto Nathan Deutsch was forced out of Germany and had to leave behind his possessions. He fled to Amsterdam where he died on July 26, 1940. He had left behind a number of paintings with a moving company in Frankfurt but they were never delivered to Amsterdam. Their whereabouts are unknown.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Max Pechstein

Grape Gathering

Medium: Tapestry
Property of the Thekla and Alfred Hess Collection

These artworks were in the collection of Alfred and Thekla Hess. After Alfred Hess died in 1931, the collection went to his son Hans Hess.

With the Nazi seizure of power, Hans and Thekla Hess were subjected to Nazi persecution. Hans Hess lost his job at the Ullstein publishing house and was forced out of Germany in 1933. First he fled to Paris and later to England where he had no money and no steady income and tried to survive with occasional small jobs. The art collection remained with his mother Tekla Hess in Germany. She was able to safely store a large part of the collection outside of Germany by sending it to the Kunsthalle Basel for an exhibition in October 1933. Later the Kunsthaus Zurich agreed to take in the collection, first for an exhibition in June 1934 and later for further safekeeping. Due to export restrictions Tekla Hess was not permitted to permanently remove the collection from Germany, but was only allowed to send them out on a temporary loan based on a so-called “freipass” which was issued by the authorities for temporary loans outside of Germany. According to the export laws, the collection had to be sent back to Germany after the end of the exhibition.

On September 15, 1935 the German parliament enacted the Nuremberg racial laws which severely restricted both the economic and civil rights of Jews in Germany. This set the stage for the plundering of Jewish property and forced many Jewish families to flee Germany. In addition, Jews were also forced to pay prohibitive exit taxes and Jewish taxes which effectively stripped them of their property.

In 1936 two GESTAPO agents visited Tekla Hess and threatened her with criminal sanctions if she did not return her art collection to Germany. Following this, Tekla Hess asked the Kunsthaus Zurich to have the artworks shipped to the Cologne Art Union, where the director had agreed to store them for Mrs. Hess.

Tekla Hess emigrated to London in 1939. The artworks remained stored in a crate in the basement of the Cologne Art Union.

When Tekla Hess asked for her paintings after the war, in 1947, the director of the museum wrote back to her and informed her that they could no longer locate the artworks. The Cologne Art Union building had sustained a bombing attack and the Hess artworks were either lost or looted. Two years later, a few paintings reappeared as they were impounded by the police in connection with the most notorious robbery counterfeiting proceeding after the war. These few paintings were returned to the Hess family. However, many others remain missing until today, including the Gobelin.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Roman Cage Cup

Medium: glass
Height: 5.90 in. (15.00 cm.)
Diameter: 8.26 in. (21.00 cm.)
Property of Altertumsmuseum, Mainz, Germany, today Landesmuseum, Mainz, Germany

With the beginning of WWII the Cage Cup, together with other archaeological items, was brought to Erbach, Germany, in the Odenwald forest. Here it was seen by an employee of the Mainz museum in 1943, who remarked, that the cup was partly damaged then. In 1945 the items were transferred from Erbach to the Central Collecting Point in Wiesbaden. In 1945 or 1946 the then director of the Mainz museum checked the objects at the CCP in Wiesbaden together with an officer of the French occupying forces. All objects were still there at this stage. That is the last information the museum had about the whereabouts of this most valuable and famous object the Mainz Altertumsmuseum ever held in its collection. All other items, formerly in Erbach and subsequently at the CCP in Wiesbaden, were returned to the museum.
(Source: Dr. Ellen Riemer, Landesmuseum Mainz, Department of Archaeology)

Peter Paul Rubens

Raising of Lazarus

Medium: oil on canvas (originally arched at the top)
Height: 103.54 in. (263.00 cm.)
Width: 77.16 in. (196.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 783; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Peter Paul Rubens

Bacchanal

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 83.46 in. (212.00 cm.)
Width: 104.72 in. (266.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 776; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Peter Paul Rubens

Diana and two nymphs bathing surprised by a Satyr

Medium: oak panel
Height: 74.80 in. (190.00 cm.)
Width: 98.00 in. (249.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 762; Missing from Berlin Friendrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Salomon van Ruysdael

River Landscape

Medium: panel
Height: 15.35 in. (39.00 cm.)
Width: 61.00 in. (24.01 cm.)
Property of the Oppenheimer collection

Forced sale at Paul Graupe auction house, Berlin, Germany, in 1935.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Egon Schiele

Black girl / Girl in black

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 39.37 in. (100.00 cm.)
Width: 39.56 in. (100.40 cm.)
Property of Franz Friedrich (Fritz) Grünbaum

Circumstances of loss: Vienna 1938.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Egon Schiele

Small landscape with houses

Medium: oil
Height: 10.03 in. (25.50 cm.)
Width: 15.27 in. (38.80 cm.)
Property of Franz Friedrich (Fritz) Grünbaum

Circumstances of loss: Vienna 1938.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Jacopo del Sellaio

The Murder of Julius Caesar

Medium: oil on poplar panel
Height: 18.11 in. (46.00 cm.)
Width: 28.34 in. (72.00 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly the Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 1133; Missing from Berlin Friedrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

(Source: Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin)

Alfred Sisley

Landscape on the Loing river

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 27.16 in. (22.00 cm.)
Width: 31.88 in. (27.00 cm.)
Property of Hedwige Zak

Confiscated by the Nazi looting organization (ERR) in Paris, France, in 1944.

Titian

Portrait of the Venetian Admiral Giovanni Moro

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 32.67 in. (83.00 cm.)
Width: 67.00 in. (26.37 cm.)
Property of the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, Germany (formerly the Kaiser-Friedrich Museum)

Inventory Number 161; Missing from Berlin Friedrichshain Flak tower (Flakturm II) repository, Germany, in early May 1945.

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller

The convalesced woman

Medium: oil on wood
Height: 24.02 in. (61.00 cm.)
Width: 30.32 in. (77.00 cm.)
Property of the Berta Morelli Collection

After consulting the lists of confiscated Jewish property in Vienna, the art dealer Herrmann Posse who was hired by Adolf Hitler for the planned Linz museum, was interested in the paintings from Berta Morelli which had been put under Nazi control. In 1940 he bought the paintings “Christus am Ölberg” and “Die Wiedergenesene” from Berta Morelli for the Hitler Museum in Linz. After the war, the U.S. military government found the paintings in a salt mine and brought them to the Collecting Point in Munich. The paintings were sent back to the Austrian authorities so that they could be restituted to their original owner, Berta Morelli. However, the Austrian government has so far refused to restitute the paintings to Bertha Morelli’s heirs.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Workshop of Canaletto

The Square of Saint Mark's, Venice

Medium: oil on canvas
Height: 20.47 in. (52.00 cm.)
Width: 41.73 in. (106.00 cm.)
Property of the Bernhard Altmann Collection, Vienna, Austria

Seized with the entire Altmann collection from the Altmann villa in Vienna on June 13, 1938. Sold at auction at Dorotheum in Vienna June 17-22, 1938, lot 125.

(Source: Heirs/Representatives)

Methodology:

The selection process of works of art on this list involved extensive searches of lost art data bases and discussions with heirs looking for lost collections. It focuses on works of art for which there was an image, and which we believe survived the war. It is not a comprehensive list; no list could be. The Monuments Men Foundation will regularly be adding to this list. It will consider all submissions meeting this criteria. The decision to add any submissions is at the sole discretion of the Foundation. Submittals, containing an image and information similar to the above entries, should be forwarded to: WWIIart@monumentsmenfoundation.org.